Tucson Mountain Retreat @ Arizona

dusttuc00

the sonoran desert is mystical landscape replete with warm hues and expanses of arid-appropriate greenery. among the eroded sculptures of
rocky outcroppings and complex reliefs of nearby arroyos, a rammed earth home designed by local firm dust lightly touches the landscape.
the tucson-based architecture, construction and fabrication team comprised of jesus robles and cade hayes, has imbued their first project
with the sacred weight of the landscape. the home values its approach through a winding desert path of lush desert plants until the architecture
emerges from the harsh scenery dotted with cacti and palo verde, a native desert shrub. the entryway is series of concrete volumes that
dissolve into the desert floor, yet playfully lead to the quiet aperture of the glazed front space. the rammed earth construction creates
meandering lateral lines across the planes of the house, serving to refer to both a topographic horizon and the richly layered skin of
the earth within and throughout that structure.

view of an exterior slab against the palette of the mystical arizona sky

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

during the approach, the home is partially concealed by the arid, lush landscape

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

the dwelling is a quiet gesture on the naturally sculpted landscape

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

view of the rammed-earth home among the cacti

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

the top level ‘sky hall’ allows uninterrupted views of the sonoran desert

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

the fragile environment is respected both actually and visually, with moments of bilateral glazing affording uninterrupted lines of sight into
the golden, arid terrain while also providing ample cross-ventilation. additionally, an upper deck further allows the inhabitant to further
internalize the dazzling, dusty stretch of terrain as the oranges of the sunset give way to the warm purple-blues of the night sky. the very
materials of the dwelling draw from the power of fire; interior walls selectively use the ‘shou sugi ban’ siding technique, a japanese
method wherein charred cedar is used to preserve wood. alabaster cladding and tiles complete the warm palette of the bathrooms,
often open to the elements, while the rest of the home is filled with the warm squares of the afternoon sun.

 

 

 

charred cedar is used as cladding

image © bill timmerman

 

 

the charred wood lines the spiral stair to the top observatory

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

playful concrete volumes rise from the dusty ground to the entrance

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

a generously glazed entryway

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

living room extends into the arid  landscape

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

bedroom view

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

the bedroom and bathroom are enclosed by a flexible system of sliding doors

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

alabaster-clad bathrooms complete the warm material scheme

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

the landscape completes the home

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

view of the cross-ventilated living area

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

rammed earth construction makes the skin of the earth evident in the interior spaces

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

view into the dining room and kitchen

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

the afternoon sun enters in red-orange slivers

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

the interior glow and warm light of the fire pit contrast with the cool desert blue at night

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

clear view through the house’s hub of activity

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

 

bedroom views display a symmetrical elevation

image © jeff goldberg / esto

 

from: http://www.designboom.com/

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